Subway

{ Featured Art; Installation; Performance; }

When I first arrived in Boston, I came across some oddly worded stickers that were present on some of the doors of the MBTA’s Red Line, “These doors do not recycle.” I did some research and responded to what I saw as vague and potentially dangerous.

Paper

{ Featured Art; Installation; }

Paper

Six paper towel dispensers were obtained from Boeing Surplus, all of which still had paper in them.
Six trees were located in Bellingham, Washington that had nails in them.
An approximation was made of how much usable wood was in each tree and the converted to how many wood products each tree could make. 150,000 toothpicks, 3000 baseball bats, 90,000 newspapers, etc.
The remaining paper in each dispenser was unrolled, the units for each specific tree were written on it, then rolled back up.
The dispensers were then placed on their respective trees early in the morning.

Wrapping Paper

{ Digital; Media; }

Wrapping Paper

I designed four styles of wrapping paper featuring images of myself from childhood to present, then used it to wrap presents for my family.

Lamar Odom

{ Featured Art; Media; }

“It’s been a learning experience. Kobe competes at a high level every night, and the only thing he asks of you is to do the same. Of course he’s demanding, but when you’re playing with a player like him, you have a championship in mind. To win a championship is confrontational—that’s the word I try to use around here with this team, that we have to be confrontational. Kobe is great at accepting confrontation, in accepting each challenge.”

—Lamar Odom, 2007

Problems tshirt

{ Media; }

2007.

Black Eye — $50

{ Performance; }

Title: Black from from omaplata to rolling armbar.
Medium: Knee to the face, blood.
$50

Silhouettes

{ Digital; }

Silhouettes

Jack Flyer

{ Media; }

Jack Flyer

The Jack Flyer was a 4.25″ x 5.5″ single-sided flyer printed on white card stock and handed out across the country in heavily trafficked flyering spots. Over 1500 copies were created.

Fold

{ Media; }

Fold

The content of my website was replaced with a single pixel width outline of a rectangle, 80 pixels tall and 480 pixels across. Visitors figured out that if they clicked the top segment of the rectangle and then clicked the bottom segment of the rectangle they could draw a line. Immediately upon drawing the line they were forward to the standard content of the site. Lines were not allowed to cross. After 6-10 lines a “fresh” rectangle appeared. After six rectangles were completed the site went back to normal.
The rectangles and lines were then transposed onto 1′ x 6′ rectangles of cardboard. The cardboard was then scored on the lines alternating front, back, front back, and then folded in the same direction and hot glued together.

Championship Belt

{ Media; }

Championship Belt

Championship Belt was a piece intended to start a dialog about what being a successful artist entailed. It was fabricated by Wildcat Customs and collaboratively designed by myself and Andrew Lazarchik. The belt was worn to various art shows as well as on the journey to and from those art shows.

Temptation

{ Installation; }

Temptation

Various materials were placed in a gallery space. No behavioral instructions were given.

Seven days later it looked like this.

Art Uniform

{ Performance; }

Art Uniform

Documentation

{ Thoughts; }

Documentation

This is currently a placeholder and will be updated soon.

Thumbs

{ Performance; }

Thumbs

I spent a day walking around Boston taking photos of my thumb next other people’s thumbs.

Cowboy Hats

{ Performance; }

Cowboy Hats

I found a box toilet seat covers that had “Free Cowboy Hats!” written on it. I took the box to an open mic at a local coffee house and offered them to the attendees.

Bulletin Board

{ Installation; }

Bulletin Board

A dozen bulletin boards lined the hallways of the basement of the School of the Museum of Fine Arts. All but one of the boards was one of the primary colors of pigment, red, blue, and yellow. The lone standout was purple. There was a space at the end of the hallway for one more billboard, a space that was conspicuously empty as the rest of wall space was in use.
I constructed a new board, using the exact materials and methods as the other boards, and installed it. Within days it came to be used like all the other billboards. Eventually it was painted red.

Pirate tshirt

{ Media; }

2006.

Print

{ Featured Art; Media; }

I hacked a late-90s era inkjet printer to “print” blank pages at random intervals between five and fifteen minutes. The printer was submitted to a show entitled “Print!” where it sat a corner of the gallery.

CBGB tshirt

{ Media; }

2004.

Manifesting Manifestos

{ Installation; }

Manifesting Manifestos

I constructed a portable “white box” gallery and placed it in a highly trafficked area of Bellingham, Washington. On the walls of the inside of the space were a grid of numbers, on the outside of the space was a large bin, filled with polypropylene spheres. Each sphere had a number on one side and a word on the other. As people approached the space, they were silently offered a single sphere and a marker. People quickly deduced that they were to enter the space, find the number, and write the word. Despite the fact that it was never suggested, most people decided to write their words in more creative ways than their normal handwriting.
Over the course of six hours, every sphere was used, and the text of an art manifesto was complete. The next day the portable gallery was reconfigured so each surface faced outward, allowing greater access to the text. The statement was then discussed with anyone who wanted to interact.

Beautiful Confrontation

{ Installation; }

Beautiful Confrontation

In early 2004, Gavin Newsom, then mayor of San Francisco, “issued a directive to the city-county clerk to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples.” At the time I was creating art in Cincinnati, Ohio and was shocked to hear deeply homophobic and heterosexist statements coming from the community of artists I was involved with. Beautiful Confrontation was an unannounced installation composed of multi-colored Christmas lights embedded in frosted polypropylene spheres and placed in a darkened room near the entrance of our studios. Inviting people with it’s beautiful diffused glow and as their eyes adjusted, confronting them with a statement intended to put their beliefs in perspective.

Generative Portraits

{ Digital; }

Generative Portraits

Generative Portraits was a long series of work that turned digital pictures of people into highly abstracted images using a series of automated analyses and modifications based on picture content. The number of iterations, style of iteration, and degree of iteration were all culled entirely from the original photo with no outside input apart from the original creation of the algorithm.

ANSI

{ ANSI; }

ANSI

ANSI art is a text/character-based form of digital art that was primarily used in software interfaces in the 80s and 90s, eventually being replaced by raster/pixel graphics. Being text-based was great for the slow computers and slow data connections of the era, but it severely limited the palette of shapes and colors that you could work with.
Artists banded together in art groups, and those groups released art packs approximately once a month. Most artists got their start in a regional group, and then moved on to groups that were based on specific styles or more commercially oriented groups.
I started in a group based in the Seattle area called RaT before jumping ship to a rival group named PaW, whose leader was planning on “taking the group national.” A few weeks later and after a name change, ANEMiA made a major splash in the ANSI scene affording me the opportunity to ply my craft with a variety of top shelf groups including CiA, FiRE, RiLE, and Samsara.
Faster computers, faster data connections, and the rise of the web saw the original functional purpose of ANSI fade away. The community frequently discussed what the future of the medium was. Many of the more commercially oriented artists dropped ANSI for pixel-based art and web design, while others, myself reveled in the limitations and continued on.
I was primarily a logo artist, at first creating graffiti inspired designs and then getting

New York Flim Flam Academy tshirt

{ Media; }

2004.
(This is not a statement about the quality of the New York Film Academy.)